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Classical Rajwada Architecture
#1
Dattaji Rao Kadam Technical Education society's Textile and Engineering Institute, Ichalkaranji, Kolhapur, Maharashtra.

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The Dattajirao Kadam Education society as its first step established the Textile and Engineering Institute in 1982. This institute was permitted by the State Government to start a Diploma course in textiles from the academic year 1982 to 83 without any grant-in aid from the Government. This was the first educational institute in the state to be started on grant basis and encouraged by the successful establishment of this, the Maharashatra State Government took a policy decision in 1983 to permit various social and industrial organizations of the state to start professional educational institutes, the decision which brought a revolution in the thinking and pattern of the education in the state.

Presently the institute conducts ten degree courses in Textiles, Mechanical Engineering, Computer Science & Engineering, Information Technology and Electronic Engineering, Electronics & Telecommunications Engineering, three diploma courses in Textiles and seven postgraduate course in textiles as well as Mechanical Engineering and Electronic Engineering The total student strength of the institute is around 3000 and has 176 teaching faculty members and 285 non-teaching staff.

www.dktes.com


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#2
Rajwada , Indore 

The palace was once the centre of all the trading activities in the city. It is a blend of Maratha, Mughal and French style of architecture. The entrance of the palace has a lofty archway with a giant wooden door which is covered with iron studs. The gopura-like monument is made up of wood and stone. It has a number of balconies windows and corridors. The entrance leads to a huge courtyard, which is surrounded by galleried rooms and the arcaded Ganesha hall, which was once the venue of all state and religious functions. This hall is now used for art exhibitions and classical music concerts.

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Rajwada has been burnt three times in history. The last fire broke out in 1984 and caused the maximum destruction. The lower three floors are made up of stone, while the top floors are made of wood. This made it very vulnerable to destruction by fire. Now, only the front part of the original structure remains. The palace has recently been renovated, which has managed to bring back the old glory to some extent. In the rear part of the palace, a beautiful garden has been created. It contains fountains, an artificial waterfall and some magnificent pieces of 11th century sculpture.

The style of construction of the Rajwada Palace is a blend of the Maratha, Mughal and French style of architecture. When viewed from the southern side, the structure looks Mughal; while from the eastern side, it looks European. The Rani Ahilya throne, Ganesha Hall and Darbar Hall have been constructed in a French fashion. 

The entrance of the palace has a lofty archway with a giant wooden door which is covered with iron studs. The gopura-like monument is made up of wood and stone. While the lower three floors are made of stone and have been painted in dark brown colour, the upper floors have been constructed using wood. The palace has many balconies, windows and corridors. The entrance leads to a huge courtyard, which is surrounded by galleried rooms and the arcaded Ganesha hall, which was once the venue of all state and religious functions. 

H.H.Ushadevi Holkar, the present Maharani of Indore, decided to reconstruct the palace in the year 2006. This process of reconstruction and development took about a year, and the new structure appears equally stunning and breathtaking as the older, original one. The Rajwada Palace is the first structure of the country which has been constructed again in the same style, using the same method and material. The windows of the palace have been outlined and give an impression to the onlooker that several eyes are looking right back at the street. 


The building, at present, is rectangular, with circular bastions on all four corners. The palace also houses the office of the Joint Director of Archaeology and a Souvenir Shop, which is managed by the Archaeology Department of the State.

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Manish Jain Luhadia 
B.Arch (hons.), M.Plan
Email: manish@frontdesk.co.in
Tel: +91 141 2743536 

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